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2010’s World’s Greatest Cities

Posted by Jae on January 4, 2011

The Global Cities Index ranks cities’ metro areas according to 25 metrics across five dimensions. The first is business activity: including the value of its capital markets, the number of Fortune Global 500 firms headquartered there, and the volume of the goods that pass through the city. The second dimension measures human capital, or how well the city acts as a magnet for diverse groups of people and talent. This includes the size of a city’s immigrant population, the quality of the universities, the number of international schools, and the percentage of residents with university degrees. The third dimension is information exchange-how well news and information is dispersed about and to the rest of the world. The number of international news bureaus, the level of censorship, the amount of international news in the leading local papers, and the broadband subscriber rate round out that dimension. The final two areas of analysis are unusual for most rankings of globalized cities or states. The fourth is cultural experience, or the level of diverse attractions for international residents and travelers. That includes everything from how many major sporting events a city hosts to the number of performing arts venues and diverse culinary establishments it boasts and the sister city relationships it maintains. The final dimension-political engagement-measures the degree to which a city influences global policy-making and dialogue. How? By examining the number of embassies and consulates, major think tanks, international organizations, and political conferences a city hosts.

We are at a global inflection point. Half the world’s population is now urban — and half the world’s most global cities are Asian. The 2010 Global Cities Index, a collaboration between Foreign Policy, management consulting firm A.T. Kearney, and The Chicago Council on Global Affairs, reveals a snapshot of this pivotal moment. In 2010, five of the world’s 10 most global cities are in Asia and the Pacific: Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore, Sydney, and Seoul. Three — New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles — are American cities. Only two, London and Paris, are European. And there’s no question which way the momentum is headed: Just as more people will continue to migrate from farms to cities, more global clout will move from West to East.

But still the United States of America has 9 cities (#1 New York, #6 Chicago, #7 Los Angeles, #12 San Francisco, #13 Washington D.C., #19 Boston, #33 Miami, #38 Houston, and #40 Atlanta) in the global city index – the most of any single country.  For North America, Canada adds 2 cities (Toronto and Montreal – sad that Vancouver didn’t make the cut) and Mexico adds 1 city (Mexico City) which brings the total to 12.

European global cities include: London, Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Madrid, Vienna, Frankfurt, Stockholm, Zurich, Moscow, Barcelona, Rome, Amsterdam, Geneva, Munich, Copenhagen, Milan, Dublin which brings the total to 18. Germany leads the European count with 3 (#16 Berlin, #20 Frankfurt, and #33 Munich), Switzerland has 2 (#24 Zurich and #32 Geneva), Spain has 2 (#17 Madrid and #26 Barcelona), Italy has 2 (#28 Rome and #42 Milan).

Oceania global cities include: Sydney (interesting Melbourne didn’t make it).

Asian global cities include: Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore, Seoul, Beijing, Shanghai, Dubai, Bangkok, Taipei, Istanbul, New Delhi, Mumbai, Osaka, Kuala Lumpur, Tel Aviv, Manila, Jakarta, Guangzhou, Bangalore, Karachi, Ho Chi Minh City, Shenzhen, Kolkata, Dhaka, Chongqing which brings the total to 25. China has 6 cities (#5 Hong Kong, #15 Beijing, #20 Shanghai, #57 Guangzhou, #62 Shenzhen, and #65 Chongqing) in the global index while India has 4 (#45 New Delhi, #46 Mumbai, #58 Bangalore, and #63 Kolkata), and Japan has 2 (#3 Tokyo and #47 Osaka).

South American global cities include: Buenos Aires, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Bogota, Caracas which brings the total to 5. Brazil has 2 cities (#35 Sao Paulo and #49 Rio de Janeiro).

African global cities include: Cairo, Johannesburg, Nairobi, Lagos which brings the total to 4.

Considering just the top 10 global cities of the world:
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/08/16/asia_rising_the_new_top_10
NYC + Chicago + LA have 40 Fortune Global 500 company headquarters.
London + Paris have 55 Fortune Global 500 company headquarters.
Tokyo by itself has 51 Fortune Global 500 company headquarters (number rises to 67 with the addition of Hong Kong, Singapore, and Seoul)
Sydney has 3 Fortune Global 500 company headquarters.

-Foreign Policy Magazine (Aug 2010)

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/08/11/the_global_cities_index_2010

Rank City Rank by Population Rank by GDP
1 New York 6 2
2 London 28 5
3 Tokyo 1 1
4 Paris 20 6
5 Hong Kong 31 14
6 Chicago 25 4
7 Los Angeles 12 3
8 Singapore 38 23
9 Sydney 43 24
10 Seoul 22 19
11 Brussels 54 48
12 San Francisco 46 16
13 Washington 42 10
14 Toronto 36 20
15 Beijing 13 33
16 Berlin 48 46
17 Madrid 34 22
18 Vienna 55 40
19 Boston 41 11
20 Frankfurt 64 20
20 Shanghai 7 21
22 Buenos Aires 11 12
23 Stockholm 59 52
24 Zurich 61 58
25 Moscow 19 13
26 Barcleona 37 31
27 Dubai 56 49
28 Rome 49 37
29 Amsterdam 63 60
30 Mexico City 5 8
31 Montreal 44 35
32 Geneva 65 61
33 Miami 58 54
33 Munich 35 18
35 Sao Paulo 3 9
36 Bangkok 32 42
37 Copenhagen 60 59
38 Houston 40 17
39 Taipei 53 26
40 Atlanta 39 15
41 Istanbul 21 30
42 Milan 52 39
43 Cairo 17 36
44 Dublin 62 55
45 New Delhi 2 32
46 Mumbai 4 25
47 Osaka 16 7
48 Kuala Lumpur 57 65
49 Rio de Janeiro 14 27
50 Tel Aviv 50 40
51 Manila 15 34
52 Johannesburg 45 43
53 Jakarta 24 47
54 Bogota 29 45
55 Caracas 51 62
56 Nairobi 47 64
57 Guangzhou 27 38
58 Bangalore 30 53
59 Lagos 18 63
60 Karachi 10 50
61 Ho Chi Minh City 33 56
62 Shenzhen 26 28
63 Kolkata 8 44
64 Dhaka 9 50
65 Chongqing 23 57
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